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The University of Denver tops the list of 2014 Paul D. Coverdell Fellows Program

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The University of Denver today announced that it ranks number one among Paul D. Coverdell Fellows Programs for returned Peace Corps volunteers. The University also ranks number four among Master's International Programs nationwide.

According to a press release from the U.S. Peace Corps, The Peace Corps Coverdell Fellows Program provides graduate school scholarships to returned Peace Corps volunteers who complete a degree-related internship in an underserved U.S. community, while they pursue their studies. By sharing their Peace Corps experience and global perspective with the communities they serve in the United States, returned volunteers fulfill the Peace Corps' Third Goal commitment to strengthen Americans' understanding of the world and its people.

The majority of the Coverdell Fellows are students at the University's Josef Korbel School of International Studies. "The Korbel School has been an ideal academic home for preparing students? to return to the field better equipped to serve marginalized communities," said Brittany Franck, DU Coverdell Fellow. "[The Josef Korbel School] has offered a well-balanced combination of theory and practice, while offering the flexibility to focus on my region and target population of interest. With the support of my professors from the School and the College of Education, I have been able to design an in-depth study of inclusive education in Ethiopia."

Additionally, the Josef Korbel School has 22 students enrolled in its Master's International program currently serving the Peace Corps overseas. "The University of Denver's Master International program offers students practical coursework in areas such as micro-finance, project management and global health affairs," said Brad Miller, Director of Graduate Admissions, at the Josef Korbel School. "These courses prepare students to make an impact during their Peace Corps service and provide them with the skills necessary for successful careers beyond their time as Peace Corps volunteers."