Past Events

Explore past events held by the Center, and learn how we've used them to advance our mission.

  • Policy Perspectives: Gun Reform Politics in Colorado

    Policy Perspectives: Gun Reform Politics in Colorado

    Tuesday, May 25, 2021 | 5:30 - 7:00pm MDT

    The Josef Korbel School of International Studies is pleased to announce the launch of an exciting new partnership between the Scrivner Institute of Public Policy and the Center on American Politics, which will serve as the hub for dialogue and research on the nexus of policy and politics in Colorado and beyond. 

    For the partnership's inaugural event, we convened a substantive civil dialogue around gun control and reform, a timely issue of utmost importance in Colorado and across the United States. Congresswoman Diana DeGette (D-CO) of Colorado's 1st Congressional District and attorney and former Colorado State Representative Cole Wist shared their perspectives and work on gun legislation at the state and national level and how policy and politics intersect to inform action on gun control.

    Watch the recording here

  • Flying Too Close to the Sun: Corporate Political Donations in a Hyper-Partisan Environment

    Flying Too Close to the Sun: Corporate Political Donations in a Hyper-Partisan Environment

    Friday, May 14, 2021 | 12-1 PM  MDT

    It has long been understood that a firm’s donations to politicians follow a pragmatic strategy as firms seek to maximize access to both political parties. However, over the last several decades the political environment has shifted towards hyper-partisanship, which prizes loyalty from donors and has turned business into the latest cultural war battleground. In this study, I question whether institutional pressure from the political environment has upended long-held notions of bipartisan access for firms and examine performance consequences for firms that have adopted more of a partisan strategy and thus conformed to the political environment.

  • Emotion, Expectancy, Aftermath: Examining voter responses to the 2016 and 2020 elections through a neurocognitive lens

    Emotion, Expectancy, Aftermath: Examining voter responses to the 2016 and 2020 elections through a neurocognitive lens

    Thursday, May 6, 2021 | 12pm-1:00pm MDT

    The human brain has evolved to make predictions and evaluate outcomes against them, learning information, generating emotions, and adjusting behavior accordingly. By studying these processes in the context of election anticipation and outcome, we can test laboratory-based hypotheses against responses to a real-life, consequential event and consider implications for group-based civic behavior. I will present work examining emotion and autobiographical memory for the 2016 American election outcome as well as new work examining changes in emotion and media information-seeking behaviors as a function of prediction-outcome discrepancy for the 2020 American election.

    Speakers include:

    Dr. Kimberly Chiew

    Watch recording here. Access Passcode: CFby7%82

  • Revamping Communication: How can we discuss politics to maximize learning and minimize animosity?

    Revamping Communication: How can we discuss politics to maximize learning and minimize animosity?

    Thursday, January 28, 2021 | 12pm-1:30pm MST

    Politics has permeated much of American life. In a society where everything is politicized, even the most mundane conversations can quickly become contentious. Not only does this drive interpersonal animosity and distrust, but also coincides with contention over contrasting factual realities. But is this new state of affairs inevitable? Are there steps we can take, as individuals, to try to combat these new trends? An expert panel of communications scholars and practitioners share their knowledge and experience about how we can avoid animosity and make our discussions more fruitful.

    Speakers include:

    • Katie Knobloch (Colorado State)
    • Mathew Levendusky (University of Pennsylvania)
    • Julia Minson (Harvard University)
    • Michael Neblo (Ohio State)
    • Robin Teater (Healthy Democracy, 2016-2020)

    Watch recording here. Access Passcode: ppIaR$x2

  • Post-Election Panel: What Did We Learn?

    Post-Election Panel: What Did We Learn?

    Tuesday, November 10, 2020 | 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm MT

    What lessons should we learn from the 2020 elections? Where did Donald Trump's coalition hold and where did it falter? How did the pandemic affect the vote? What have we learned about the political roles of race, gender, faith, partisanship, electability, and more? Did our institutions protect us or fail us?

    Join us for a discussion on all these questions with our panel of experts.

    • Megan Verlee (Colorado Public Radio)
    • Deborah Avant (Korbel School of International Studies)
    • Lisa Martinez (Department of Sociology & Criminology)
    • Sam Kamin (Sturm College of Law)
    • Chris Celaya (Center on American Politics)
    • Seth Masket (Center on American Politics)

    Watch here.

  • Electoral College and the National Voter Compact

    Electoral College and the National Voter Compact

    Tuesday, October 20, 2020 | 5:00 pm – 6:30 pm MDT

    Is it time to rethink the Electoral College? Join us for a discussion with scholars and policymakers about America's unusual method of picking presidents, and why it has become so controversial in recent years. We'll also talk about the choice Colorado voters face regarding the Electoral College on this fall's ballot.

    • Seth Masket, Center on American Politics
    • Robert Hardaway, University of Denver Sturm College of Law
    • Michael Foote, Colorado State Senate
    • Jennifer Nicoll Victor, George Mason University

    Watch the recording here.

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