Publications

Thought Leaders Across International Fields

Our internationally acclaimed and award-winning faculty regularly publish world-class research and scholarship in books and academic journals. They also frequently contribute to current debates about some of the world’s most pressing problems. Discover how your professors are making their impact below.

Korbel also houses two leading journals:

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War, Women, and Power

Book | Mary Berry

From Violence to Mobilization in Rwanda and Bosnia-Herzegovina

What We Can Learn from Looking at Private Security Across Time and Space

Article | Deborah Avant

In the last 10 years or so, scholars have begun to collect data to examine the industry and its potential impacts.

When Things Don’t Fall Apart: Global Financial Governance and Developmental Finance in an Age of Productive Incoherence

Book | Ilene Grabel

An account of the significant though gradual, uneven, disconnected, ad hoc, and pragmatic innovations in global financial governance and developmental finance induced by the global financial crisis.

Why “Bread and Oil” Protests in Sudan Prompted a Cabinet Reshuffle

Article | Cullen Hendrix

Sudan is now on its third cabinet in two years, with previous governments unable to tackle the country’s economic challenges.

Will Climate Change Lead to More World Conflict?

Article | Cullen Hendrix

Academics have disagreed on this question, until recently. Here’s what to expect.

Will the genocide against Rohingyas continue?

Article | Haider Khan

According to UN investigators in late 2018 and early January 2019, genocide against the Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar has hardly stopped.

Women’s political inclusion in Kenya’s devolved political system

Article | Marie Berry

Kenya’s 2010 constitutional reforms devolved the political system and included a quota designed to secure a minimum threshold of women in government.

“I Don’t Belong Here”: Understanding Hostile Spaces

Article | Juliana Restrepo Sanin

Sexual harassment law is based in part on a theory of “hostile spaces,” with the central idea being that individual harassing actions have larger consequences for the more general environment in which they take place. But what exactly do they do?